Sister Cities

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Warringah teenagers at Brewarrina

Sister Cities Agreement

In July, 2000 Warringah Council signed a Sister Cities Agreement with Brewarrina Shire Council. Brewarrina, or ‘Bre’ as it is known to locals, is a remote community located in north-west NSW, 800km from Sydney.

The idea of the relationship is to promote friendship between beach and bush communities and allow a greater understanding of the issues facing each area. The Councils’ agreed that one way to achieve this is by a youth exchange, where young people would be able to meet, form friendships and learn about each other's lives and communities.

The Youth Exchange Program consists of six young people from Warringah spending a week in Brewarrina in the Winter School holidays (July), and a reciprocal visit by six Brewarrina young people in the Summer school holidays (January).

The visit is free to participants. Find out more at our youth programs page.

Goodwill Beach City Agreement

In August, 2011 Warringah signed a Goodwill Beach City Agreement with Honolulu.

The ceremony came as part of an annual celebration of Duke Kahanamoku, who popularised surfing in Australia with a famous demonstration at Freshwater beach in 1915. Freshwater was a named a World Surfing Reserve, in part, because of this history.

Freshwater Surf Lifesaving Club is part of the goodwill agreement.

The signing by Warringah Mayor, Michael Regan and Honolulu Mayor, Peter Carlisle was a celebration and strengthening of historic ties between the two regions.

This ongoing relationship will foster mutual respect in each city's history, culture and community, including the encouragement of tourism and preservation of natural beach resources.

In July, 2011 Council resolved: 'That in partnership with Freshwater Surf Lifesaving Club, Council prepares an agreement with the coastal community of Waikiki in Honolulu, Hawaii and that this agreement be forged with mutual respect and friendship and with the hope of enhancing the already strong bond that ties our two great communities.'